One of today’s new housing trends was also popular more than thousands of years ago — communal living.1 In the Middle Ages, society was more interdependent. It wasn’t unusual for households to consist of far more than just biological family members; a myriad of shifting residents included townspeople, friends, poor married couples, other people’s children,…

Read More

When looking ahead in anticipation of Social Security benefits, many people expect to wait until an average age of 66 to make a claim.1 However, Nationwide Retirement Institute’s fifth annual Social Security survey found many retirees start drawing Social Security at the earliest possible age of 622 — frequently the result of being laid off…

Read More

It seems as if inflation has been biding its time. Since the financial crisis a decade ago, growth in prices and wages has been muted.1 However, many financial analysts believe that’s about to change. A jobs report from early March revealed continued hiring and a moderate increase in wages. The stock markets welcomed the news,…

Read More

In his first year in office, President Trump has promoted his “America first” philosophy. This new focus, with its trade protectionism and tough stance on immigration, has somewhat changed the U.S. narrative on a world scale.1 Considering this new emphasis on America first, perhaps it’s worth looking at how the U.S. ranks on the world…

Read More

There is little doubt that Medicare and Social Security are important programs that help older Americans in retirement, particularly now that so many are living beyond previous life expectancy rates. In fact, past models for savings rates may be failing many older Americans, who represent the only demographic seeing significant increases in poverty rates in…

Read More

Let’s face it: Deciding when to draw Social Security benefits is not always an easy matter. It doesn’t get any easier when one spouse dies. On top of grief and family upheaval, a surviving spouse must choose whether to take his or her own monthly benefit or 100 percent of the late spouse’s monthly benefit.…

Read More

The Roth IRA, established by the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997, offered a new twist to the traditional IRA — namely, after-tax contributions. What this means is that a Roth IRA owner may contribute money up to the limit each year with income that has already been taxed. The account’s earnings grow tax free, and…

Read More

One philosophy of investing, as opined by Warren Buffett, is to be “fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful.”1 The nation’s eight-year bull market, however, has tested that philosophy. Most market analysts would agree that it was more important to be in the market and taking advantage of gains than to…

Read More

Tax season is upon us. According to the IRS, about 90 percent of taxpayers now file their taxes electronically. The agency touts the service as more accurate, convenient and secure than paper claims, and people usually receive their tax refunds faster. The IRS offers free tax filing assistance to filers who earn $54,000 a year…

Read More

What do Harvey Weinstein, “America First” policies and asset allocation have in common? Quite a bit, it turns out, when it comes to evaluating the various risk factors that can affect an investment or portfolio. Anyone who’s ever taken a hot minute to observe the market or talk shop about the economy must realize any…

Read More